auroral oval
My first source to see where are the auroras now...or so! Red arrow shows noon...so on the other side , it's midnight left number shows how I'm feeling: 1: I feel sad! 10: I go nuts! the more red, the more I feel good! BIG THANKS TO: NOAA








spedometer
The more red, the more happy I am!








aurora dashboard!
Bz must be high, speed is better when high and a high pressure is something very good for northern light photographers! So , the more red, the better! BIG THANKS TO: NOAA








Kp index
Above 5, we have a chance to see them. When its yellow, I smile but when it's red, get out now! BIG THANKS TO: NOAA








sunspots
Explosions on the sun that spits out billions of tons of plasma in space The more, the better especially if they're in the center of the sun so that the explosions are heading our way on earth. If there are sunspots on the left, in 7 days, they'll be in the center because the sun takes 28 days to turn on itself...way to predict the auroras! BIG THANKS TO: NASA/SOHO








the sun in h alpha
This one shows sun's eruptions,,, the more, the merrier! By the way, the earth is only 1/108th of the sun's diameter!. So a small flame on the sun is many times as big as our small planet! BIG THANKS TO: NASA/SOHO








Sun spots
Explosions on the sun that spits out billions of tons of plasma in space The more, the better especially if they're in the center of the sun so that the explosions are heading our way on earth. If there are sunspots on the left, in 7 days, they'll be in the center because the sun takes 28 days to turn on itself...way to predict the auroras! BIG THANKS TO: NASA/SOHO








solar wind and solar system
The blue is the solar wind coming at us...good! The red is whats going away from us...bad! The sun is in the center of the spiral








auroral oval
The lucky few seeing the auroras now!








solar cycle
Every 11 years, there are more sunspots, so more explosions, so more auroras. The next peak is due around 2013-14. Galileo was the first to observe them with a telescope in 1610



© 2010 Michel Tournay / photographer